Monday, August 31, 2015

Second Chances: Indiana’s Evolving Expungement Law

Second Chances: Indiana’s Evolving Expungement Law

While still a subject of some controversy, expungement, the process by which an Indiana citizen can seal past criminal records, has undergone significant revision since its inception. In 2012, Indiana lawmakers enacted legislation popularly known as the “Second Chance Law.” Under the 2012 procedure, only those convicted of misdemeanors and non-violent class D felonies were [...]

Employee Medical Leave Rights: It’s Complicated

Employee Medical Leave Rights: It’s Complicated

May 12, 2015 by Brenda Rodeheffer

Once upon a time, the employer determined medical leave. Whether an employee had the ability to stay home when ill without risk of termination depended on the boss.
After a nine-year legislative battle, in 1993 Congress enacted the Family & Medical Leave Act (FMLA). For many workers, FMLA proved to be a great boon. [...]

One and Done: How INcite is reducing redundant DNA collection

One and Done: How INcite is reducing redundant DNA collection

February 24, 2015 by Mary L. DePrez

One of the responsibilities of probation officers is to collect body fluid samples from clients to test for the presence of drugs or alcohol when that is a condition of their probation. But did you also know that Indiana law requires officers to collect a DNA sample for persons convicted of a felony? [...]

All Courts Shall Be Open

All Courts Shall Be Open

October 3, 2014 by Kathryn Dolan

Continued emphasis on fair and impartial justice as Dickson transfers leadership to Rush
On June 11, 2014, Brent E. Dickson announced he would step down as Chief Justice of Indiana before September first and continue serving as an Associate Justice on the five-member Supreme Court. When Dickson informed the Judicial Nominating Commission of his plans, [...]

Civics Workshop for Teachers

Civics Workshop for Teachers

June 26, 2014 by Dr. Elizabeth Osborn

Surveys, talk show hosts and the nightly news remind us that American students are woefully uninformed about even the most basic functions of our government. While no one group or organization can solve this problem on its own, the Indiana Supreme Court—through its “Courts in the Classroom” (CITC) outreach project—is doing its part by [...]

On Your Mark, Get Set…Go?

On Your Mark, Get Set…Go?

April 25, 2014 by Adrienne Meiring

The Ethics of Judicial Campaigns (part 1 of 2)
A whirlwind of activity, the pulse of adrenaline, and general excitement (and despair) loom in the air—it’s the change of season. Racing, you say? No, it’s judicial campaign season.
With the primary elections approaching, I have received an increasing number of questions about judicial elections [...]

Celebrating Constitution Day

Celebrating Constitution Day

February 7, 2014 by Dr. Elizabeth Osborn

In September, forty-eight judges and one Supreme Court staff attorney visited schools across the state in celebration of Constitution Day. September 17, 2013 marked the 226th anniversary of the 1787 signing of the U.S. Constitution in Philadelphia.
For decades September 17th was noted on calendars as “Citizenship Day,” but rarely received much attention.
That all changed [...]

Juvenile Law: Special Edition – Introduction

Juvenile Law: Special Edition – Introduction

October 28, 2013 by Editor

The Indiana Court Times Editorial Board is pleased to present this special edition on Juvenile Law.
Traditionally, Court Times includes stories and information on a variety of topics, but the Board decided our readers would appreciate a special issue dedicated to how the courts serve children in our state.
There are many exciting initiatives underway designed to [...]

Veteran’s Court: Restorative Justice

Veteran’s Court: Restorative Justice

August 16, 2013 by Hon. Maria D. Granger

The first defendant called on the Initial Hearing docket is a 25-year old, well-mannered and well-groomed, male who stands at attention, but his eye contact is distant and blank. He is charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance, a Class D Felony. Service members who run afoul of the law in returning to [...]

Lawmakers Boost Public Defense Funding

Lawmakers Boost Public Defense Funding

June 24, 2013 by Deborah A. Neal , Lilia G. Judson

The Constitution of the United States and the Indiana Constitution require that indigent criminal and other defendants be provided adequate legal representation. In Indiana, the fiscal responsibility for this service falls primarily on county governments. In 2012, the total public defense costs in Indiana were in excess of $71 million. Through the state [...]

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